Why Study Design and Technology?

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Do you love solving problems and being creative? Or perhaps you just keep coming up with great ideas but don’t know what to do with them?

If that’s the case, studying design and technology could be for you! And it can open you up to a lot of career choices...

What is design and technology? 

Design and technology is an area of study that focuses on planning, designing and creating things (called "products") which people use.

Think about your toaster (stay with us). Someone had to spend a great deal of time thinking about how to make it look good while also making it work. That's what design and technology is all about!

While studying this subject, you can learn how to design and make anything from electronics, clothes, furniture, food, and even computer programs. 

The subject is sometimes split up into the following categories:

  • Electronic products: Use electronic materials to build interesting devices.
  • Food technology: Design recipes and create food products while learning about nutrition.
  • Graphics: Learn how to use 2D and 3D modelling programs to plan and design products. 
  • Resistant materials technology: Work with materials like metals, plastic, wood, and use them to make interesting products.
  • Textiles technology: Learn about different fabrics, how they are made, and ways you can use them to create products.

'Design and technology is a broad subject, leading to careers in software, fashion and design'

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What skills will I get with design and technology?

By studying design and technology, you’ll be able to build up your creativity, problem solving, planning, and evaluation skills. Since many projects are done via group work, you’ll also gain communication and teamwork skills. Not to mention a great work out of your creativity bone!

What careers can I do with design and technology?

There are plenty! And we’re not kidding. Design and technology can set you up for a career in a wide variety of industries such as fashion, engineering, architecture, information technology, careers in hospitality, and even education.

Popular careers for people with design and technology qualifications include: fashion designer, tailor, product designer, architect, software engineer, civil engineer, carpenter and chef. 

What degrees and other qualifications do I need design and technology for?

If you want to study design and technology at university level, some courses require you to have completed the subject as part of your A-levels

Although some university courses may not list design and technology as an entry requirement, it can still be very helpful for courses in architecture, engineering, information technology and computer science.

A GCSE or A-level in design and technology can also be useful for apprenticeships in carpentry, construction, food manufacture, fashion and textiles, interior manufacturing, and engineering technology.

What subjects does design and technology go with?

Design and technology goes well with art, but also science and technology subjects, including physics, maths, chemistry and IT. When it comes to the sciences, having knowledge of how physical and chemical processes work can come in handy when designing different products. Including food!

The subject also supports the study of art, as sculpture and other disciplines require an understanding of how structures can be designed to support themselves. 

Where can I find out more?

Check out our other Why Study? articles...

Image credits

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